Design & Technology

CURRICULUM AIMS AND VALUES

Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

Schemes of work prepare students to participate confidently and successfully in an increasingly technological world. Students will gain awareness and learn from wider influences on Design and Technology including historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic factors. Students will get the opportunity to work creatively when designing and making and apply technical and practical expertise. Students will study core technical and designing and making principles, including a broad range of design processes, materials, techniques and equipment. They will also have the opportunity to study specialist technical principles in greater depth. The subject of Design Technology encourages problem solving, innovation, planning and evaluation as autonomous learners within the skills based learning at KS3 planned using the NC POS so that by the beginning of KS4 all learners have a bank of knowledge, understanding and skills that allow them to access the GCSE which is based on iterative processes.

As the school has such a broad range of feeder primary schools, we plan our KS3 curriculum to build upon the legal entitlement for D&T delivered at KS2. We develop existing skills and knowledge to ensure learners have an understanding of materials, tools, equipment and processes. In GCSE D&T, learners need a base of knowledge to select appropriate methods of manufacture and we build this knowledge up in KS3.

Aims

What is the vision for all pupils’ knowledge and understanding and what will this allow them to do? Link to whole school aims where possible

The national curriculum for design and technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others

In addition to having the opportunity to progress to the next level of Design and Technology Textiles excellence, at Greenbank High School the wider benefits of DT Textiles are recognised and valued greatly:

 DT Textiles education prepares students to learn:

  • Enhances fine motor skills
  • Prepares the brain for achievement
  • Fosters superior working memory
  • Cultivates better thinking skills

 DT Textiles education facilitates student academic achievement:

  • Improves recall and retention of verbal information
  • Advances mathematical achievement
  • Boosts reading and English language skills
  • Improves average SAT scores

 DT Textiles education develops the creative capacities for lifelong success:

  • Sharpens student attentiveness
  • Strengthens perseverance
  • Equips students to be creative
  • Supports better study habits and self-esteem

 DT Textiles education prepares students to learn:

  • Enhances fine motor skills
  • Prepares the brain for achievement
  • Fosters superior working memory
  • Cultivates better thinking skills

 DT Textiles education facilitates student academic achievement:

  • Improves recall and retention of verbal information
  • Advances mathematical achievement
  • Boosts reading and English language skills
  • Improves average SAT scores

 DT Textiles education develops the creative capacities for lifelong success:

  • Sharpens student attentiveness
  • Strengthens perseverance
  • Equips students to be creative
  • Supports better study habits and self-esteem

CURRICULUM DESIGN AND ORGANISATION

Curriculum organisation

At KS3 students receive 4 (Year 7) or 3 (Year 8) lessons of DT in a fortnight.

Assessments include researching skills, designing, making, evaluation and knowledge and understanding. Projects are delivered using an iterative framework.

Pupils benefit from a carousel system ensuring they achieve the best quality learning from specialist subject teachers. Homework is set in each project.

At KS4 students receive 4 lessons in Year 9 and 10 fortnightly and 5 lessons over two weeks in Year 11.

All DT classes are mixed ability and where applicable work is differentiated by task according to ability.

Curriculum provision

The KS3 curriculum has been designed to meet the criteria set out in the NC KS3 POS to build upon KS2 and develop design skills, practical skills and deepen the understanding of D&T theoretical knowledge. We aim to deliver lessons using a range of materials to broaden the learners experience and skills with a wide range of tools and equipment as well as finishing techniques. We aim to give students the experience to work with plastics, metals, wood, textiles, systems and control as well as develop their design skills.

Year 7 – the curriculum has been designed to develop the creative, technical and practical expertise of learners and support them to evaluate and test their ideas for a wide range of users. Pupils are introduced to fabric types, hand and machine sewing techniques and focus on mass production in the fashion industry. They work with electronics and timbers and identify the main design principles as well as deepening their understanding of health and safety within the subject and industry.

Year 8 – environmental issues are introduced and construction techniques using both machine and hand skills. Learners identify a range of materials and develop marking out, cutting and joining skills. Quality control and assurance are introduced as they develop their skills using a range of specialist tools and equipment.

KS4 – pupils follow the GCSE D&T Edexcel course which covers a range of materials and also focuses in more depth on textiles.

CULTURAL CAPITAL

Our school is committed at every stage to ensure that no pupil is disadvantaged because they do not have the cultural experience to access the full curriculum and within _________ the following key areas are developed:

  • A love of the subject and a love of learning
  • How does the department faculty develop careers provision and aspiration? (May refer to particular SOW)
  • How is cultural participation taught?
  • What curriculum based visits take place to support the delivery and understanding of the curriculum?
  • What extra-curricular activities are on offer to enhance the curriculum for all pupils?
  • Literacy skills are a key component of accessing all curriculum areas. In ___________, skills are developed through the use of ……. How is reading developed (not just giving opportunities) in the subject?
  • How does the subject support pupils’ who have less cultural capital?

Vulnerable pupils’ access to this provision is monitored carefully in order to support those whose cultural gap may be wider.

 The curriculum gives all pupils the chance to experience all elements of the subject at both key stages. It also provides a foundation upon which to build at KS5. As well as educational development, the students have the opportunity to work in teams, create ideas and plan work within a budget to design and make products for various users. These skills can be transferred into any situation throughout their life, especially in the workplace.

In addition to maths and science, the GCSE in Design and Technology embeds knowledge, techniques and practices from a wide range of subjects, including art and design, business, computer science and geography.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

The personal development curriculum embraces the strands of Citizenship, Personal, Health and Social Education (PHSE), Careers Education and Guidance (CEAG) and Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural (SMSC) educational policies. In D&T personal development of pupils is supported by the ability to work creatively to allow pupils to solve real life problems in a changing world. Understanding of social, moral, economic and environmental issues surrounding the design and manufacture of products.

Students develop presentation skills, group work skills, project and time management.

In addition, students are taught to:

  • Be aware of sustainability and ethical issues in material production, in use and end of life.
  • To understand some materials are considered a finite resource.
  • Understand the impact materials have on the environment when they are sent to landfill and not reused or recycled.
  • Understand moral and social considerations when designing for users from different countries and religions.
  • Be aware of sustainable fashion and textiles

Mrs J Williams – Director of Learning Design Technology

Miss C Parry – Teacher of DT

Ms C Addison – Teacher of DT

Mr M Melia – Teacher of DT

Ms C Usher – Teacher of DT

Mr L Dunne – Teacher of DT

Mr P Palmer – Teacher of DT

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